CURRICULUM STRUCTURE

 

The curriculum structure of the UM Postgraduate Chemistry Education Doctoral Study Program starting 2015 is given in the following table.

 

Table 1. Curriculum for S3 Chemistry Education

MK CODE

COURSES

Sks

Js

SEMESTER

1

2

3

4

5

6

A.

Courses Scientific and Educational Foundation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I

Courses General 8 credits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MKPS902

Educational Philosophy

2

2

X

MKPS903

Educational Insights

2

2

X

MKPS905

Research Design and Data Analysis

4

4

X

II

Eyekuliah Specialization Field of Study 18 Sks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PKIM901

Development of Chemistry Learning Strategies

2

2

X

PKIM902

Problems and Prospects for the Development of Chemistry Education

2

2

_

X

PKIM903

Evaluation and Development of Chemical Education Programs

2

2

- X

PKIM904

Seminar: Study and Analysis of Field of Study Research 

2

2

X

NKIM901

Review of Structure and Reactivity of Organic Compounds *

3

3

X

NKIM902

Analytical Chemistry Review *

3

3

X

 

NKIM903

Review & Development of Structure and Reactivity of Inorganic Compounds *

3

3

X

NKIM904

Review & Development of Material for Kinetics and Reaction Dynamics - Chemical Reactions *

3

3

X

NKIM905

Biotechnology Philosophy and Chemistry *

3

3

X

NKIM906

Materials Science and Technology **

1

1

X

NKIM907

Molecular spectroscopy **

1

1

X

NKIM908

Capita selecta of organic reactions **

1

1

X

PKIM905

Chemistry-based Learning Innovations Laboratory Activity and E-learning**

1

1

X

PKIM906

Inquiries in Chemistry Learning **

1

1

X

III

Dissertation 30 credits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MDIS991

 Dissertation Proposal Seminar

2

X

X

MDIS990

 Dissertation

28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scope of Activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

· Individual progress seminars

2

X

 

· Seminar on research results

2

X

X

 

· International journal publications

4

X

X

 

· Writing Guidance and Dissertation Examination#

20

X

X

X

X

Total SKS

56

15

8

7

20

4

2

Information:

  1. * = Selected 3 courses (8-9 credits)
  2. ** = Selected at least 1 course
  3. # = Implemented in 4 (four) semesters

 

DESCRIPTION OF THE MATAKULIAH (COURSE DESCRIPTION OF DOCTORATE PROGRAM)

 

MKPS902 Educational Philosophy (Philosophy of  Education) (2 Sks / 2 Js)

Competence / Competence

  1. Describing the nature of science (NOS = the Nature of Science) and scientific inquiry.
  2. Describing the nature of science education according to constructivist philosophy and behavioristic philosophy.
  3. Linking philosophical problems with science and technology education.
  4. Promote personal philosophical views of science and technology and make conclusions related to current issues that are developing in the world of education.
  5. Designing science-based science learning (NOS).

 

  1. Describe the nature of science (NOS = the Nature of Science) and scientific inquiry.
  2. Describe the nature of science education according to the constructivist and behaviorism philosophy.
  3. Linking the philosophical problems with science and technology education,
  4. Asking personal philosophical views of science and technology and make conclusions related to the current issues that develop in education.
  5. 5. Designing learning science-based The Nature of Science (NOS).

 

Study Materials / Learning Materials

  1. The essence of science (NOS) and scientific inquiry
  2. Constructivistic philosophy and behavioristic philosophy in science education
  3. Recent issues that develop in the world of education
  4. Examples of science-based science learning (NOS)
  5. The philosophy and development of modern biotechnology and the contribution of biotechnology in supporting human life.

 

  1. The Nature of Science (NOS) and scientificinquiry
  2. Constructivistand behaviorism in science education
  3. The current situation is developed in education
  4. Examples of learning science based on The Nature of Science (NOS)
  5. Philosophy and the development of modern biotechnology as well as the contribution of biotechnology in supporting human life.

 

Destination / Objectives

Through literature studies, discussions, presentations and structured assignments, it is hoped that students will be able to understand: the relationship between the nature of science and scientific inquiry, constructivist and behavioristic philosophy in science education, responsive to developing problems in science and technology education, able to present philosophical views on current issues. that develops, and is able to design science-based science learning (NOS).

 

Through the study of literature, discussions, presentations and structured assignments, students are expected toable to understand: the link between the nature of science and scientific inquiry, constructivist and behaviorism philosophy in science education, responsive to the growing problems in science and technology education, able to propose a philosophical view of the current issues that develop, and able to design science learning based on The Nature of Science (NOS).

 

Bibliography / References

  1. Flick, LB & Lederman, NG 2006. Scientific Inquiry and the Nature of Science: Implication for Teaching, Learning & Science Education. Nederland: Springer.
  2. Derek, Hodson. 1985. Philosophy of science, science and science education. Studies in Science Education, No. 12: 25-57.
  3. McComas, WF 1998. The principle elements of the nature of science: Dispelling the myths. In WF McComas (Ed.), The nature of science in science education: Rationales and strategies (pp. 53–70). Dordrech: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  4. McComas, WF, Clough, MP, & Almazroa, H. 1998. The role and character of the nature of science in science education. In WF McComas (Ed.), The nature of science in science education: Rationales and strategies. Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers
  5. Bernal, PJ 2006. Addressing the Philosophical Confusion Regarding Constructivism in Chemical Education. Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 83 (2): 324-326.
  6. Curriculum 2013.

 

MKPS905 Research Design and Data Analysis (Research Design and Data Analysis) (4 Sks /4 Js)

Competitions / Competence

Understand various chemical education research designs and their applications to find answers to the problems studied. Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of specific research designs and their appropriateness for use in specific chemistry education problems. Understand various data analysis techniques obtained by applying certain research designs and interpreting the results of the analysis in the context of the problem under study.

Comprehend various research designs and their applications in chemical education research to find out answers to the problems examined. Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the research design and appropriateness for use in particular chemical education issues. Comprehend the different techniques for data analysis obtained with the application of particular research design and interpret the results of the analysis in the context of the problems examined.

 

Study Materials / Learning Materials

Various sources, especially in the form of journal articles reporting the results of chemistry learning research and review articles on research design and data analysis.

Various resources primarily in the form of journal articles which report research results in chemistry education and review articles about research design and data analysis.

 

Destination / Objectives

Through critical analysis of various research reports published in journals, students can determine the research design that will be used in their dissertation research. Can use various data analysis techniques, especially those related to his dissertation research and develop the meaning of the results of the analysis.

Through critical analysis of various research reports published in scientific journals, students are able to determine research design appropriated with their dissertation research. Students are able to use various data analysis techniques, primarily associated with their dissertation research, and develop the meaning of the analysis results.

 

List References / References

  1. Cresswell, JW 2008. Educationla Research: Planning, conducting, and Evaluating Quantitative and Qualitative Research, 3rd Ed. New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall.
  2. Various Journals articles, especially published in highly reputable journals such as: Research in Science Education, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, Science Education, International Journal of Science Education, and International Journal of Research in Science and Mathematics Education.

 

PKIM901 Development of a Chemistry Learning Strategy (Development of Chemistry Teaching strategy) (2 Sks /2 Js)

Competitions / Competence

Able to develop innovative chemistry learning strategies based on philosophical critical analysis of learning, learning theories and models, and characteristics of school and college chemistry materials.

Able to develop an innovative strategy for teaching chemistry based on critical analysis of instructional philosophys, theories and models of teaching, and also characteristic of school and university's chemistry content.

 

Study Materials / Learning Materials

Facilitating learning: design, planning, and presentation of learning; meaningful learning: asking questions, discussions, group work; teaching concepts and teaching skills, experimental and indirect learning strategies, collaborative learning strategies, concept learning, problem-based learning, special approaches to practicum learning, innovative learning strategy development practices.

Facilitating learning: Lesson and unit planning and delivery, Engaging learning: questioning, discussion, seatwork, and homework; teaching concept and teaching skill, the indirect and experimental instructional strategies, the collaborative learning strategy, teaching concepts, teaching for thinking problem-based learning, selecting approach to teach chemistry in the laboratory, and practice to develop innovative teaching strategy for certain chemistry content.

 

Destination / Objectives

After examining learning facilitation, meaningful learning, teaching concepts, indirect and experimental learning strategies, collaborative learning, and problem-based learning, students can develop innovative chemistry learning strategies relevant to the characteristics of chemical materials.

After deeply study on facilitating learning, engaging learning, teaching concepts, the indirect and experimental instruction strategies, the collaborative learning strategy, and teaching for thinking and problem-based learning, students able to develop innovative strategies for teaching chemistry that are relevant with chemistry content characteristics .

 

Bibliography / References

  1. Lang, HR & d Evan, DN 2006. Models, strategies, and methods for effective teaching. Boston: Pearson.
  2. Pienta, NJ, Cooper, MM, & Greenbowe, TJ 2009. Chemists' guide to effective teaching. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
  3. Herron, DJ 1996. The Chemistry Classroom, Formulas for Succesful Teaching. Washington, D. C: American Chemical Society.
  4. Cruickshank, DR, Jenkins, DB, & Metcalf, KK 2006. The act of teaching. 4Th Ed. New York: McGraw Hill Companies, Inc.
  5. Weinbaum, A., Allen, D., Blythe, T., Simon, K., Seidel, S., & Rubin, C. 2004. Teaching As Inquiry Asking Hard Questions to Improve Practice and Student Achievement. New York: Teacher College Press.

 

PKIM902 Problems and Development Prospects Chemistry Education (Problem and Prospect in Developing Chemistry Education) (2 Sks /2 Js)

Competence / Competence

Identify, analyze and produce design solutions to actual problems that are often found in Chemistry / Science education. Anticipate problems in chemistry education that may arise as a result of the development of chemistry and its learning.

Indentifying, analyzing, and producing a plan for solving actual problems in Science / Chemistry Education. Anticipating the emergence of new problems or array of problems in Science / Chemistry education because of the development of Chemistry and its learning.

Study Materials / Learning Materials

Various texts and research reports, especially those published in reputable learning journals.

There is no limitation of the uses of resources for this course. However the relevance and 'the state of the art' status of the resources should become the main considerations of the resource to analyze.

Destination / Objectives

Through critical and analytic studies, students determine problem choices to be studied in depth and find a solution. Maximizing the potential for prospective problem solving and not choosing a solution design that might create difficulties in data analysis. Students are also able to anticipate and predict problems that require solving. Students are also expected to be able to anticipate problems that will arise as a result of the development of various related matters.

Through a crytical analysis students are able to identify probliems in Chemistry Education which need urged solutions. Students are expected to be able to effectively find a solution which will smartly and efficiently solve the problem without creating more complexity to the problem itself. Students are also expected to be able to anticipate the emergence of new problems in the future of Chemistry Education because of the development of the field.

Bibliography / References

Various texts and research reports, especially those published in reputable learning journals.

Research reports and articles especially published in reputable education journals.

PKIM903 Evaluation and Development of the Chemical Education Program (Evaluation and Development of Chemical Education Program)(2 Sks /2 Js)

Competence / Competence

  1. Mastering fundamentally and evaluating comprehensively and conceptually evaluation programs in chemistry education and learning;
  2. Develop a comprehensive and conceptual evaluation-based chemistry education program.

 

Study Materials / Learning Materials

  1. Essential and conceptual studies of the strengths and weaknesses of evaluation techniques and procedures, including: (1) analysis of the principles and philosophy of assessment and the implementation of chemistry learning, (2) test and non-test techniques in the bloom taxonomy-based assessment (assessment) tests in chemistry-science learning, (4) alternative assessment: the need for alternative assessments, performance assessment, observation and questions, presentations and discussions, projects and investigations, portfolios and journals, and other types of alternative assessments;
  2. Development of educational programs and chemistry learning based on evaluation results at various levels of education, including: (1) identifying and limiting needs for development, (2) designing development, (3) constructing development, and (4) disseminating development results.

 

  1. Advantage and disadvantage of technical and procedure of evaluation, including: (1) principles and philosophical of assessment analysis, (2) test and non-test in assessment based-on Bloom Taxonomy, (3) types of assessment in learning science-chemistry, (4) alternative assessment: need to assessment alternative, performance assessment, observation and question, presentation and discussion, project and investigation, portfolio and journal, and other alternative assessment;
  2. Development of chemistry education and learning program based-on evaluation results in education levels: (1) identifying and defining need for development, (2) designing development, and (4) deseminating development products.

 

Destination / Objectives

Through literature reviews, presentations, and discussions, students can:

  1. Reasoning and evaluating in a comprehensive and conceptual evaluation in chemistry education and learning.
  2. Developing a comprehensive and conceptual evaluation-based chemistry education and learning program.

 

Through literature study, presentation, and discussion, student should be able to:

  1. think and review comprehensively and conceptual about evaluation in

     science-chemistry educating and learning;

  1. develop chemistry educating and learning based-on evaluation results

     comprehensively and conceptually.

 

Bibliography / References

  1. Enger, SK & Yeger, RE 2009. Assessing student understanding in science. California: Crowin Press.
  2. Glencoe Science Professional Series. —-. Alternate Assessment in The Science Classroom. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  3. Hassard, J. 2005. The Art of Teaching Science: Inquiry and Innovation in Middle School and High School. New York & Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  4. Bybee, RW, Powell, JC, & Trowbridge, LW 2008. Teaching Secondary School Science: Strategies for Developing Scientific Literacy. Columbus: Pearson-Merill Prentice Hall.
  5. Thiagarajan, S., Semmel, D.Sl, & Semmel, MI —-. Instructional Development for Training Teachers of Exceptional Children: A Source Book.
  6. Latest and relevant laws and government regulations on education and / or curriculum.
  7. Regulation of the Minister of Education and Culture (or the relevant one) concerning Education and / or Curriculum and the most recent relevant.

 

NKIM901 Review of Structure and Reactivity of Organic Compounds (Review of Structure and Reactivity of Organic Compound) (3 Sks / 3 Js)

Competitions / Competence

  1. Mastering the fundamental and comprehensive relationship between structure and physical properties and reactivity of organic compounds.
  2. Develop learning materials for the relationship between structure and physical properties and reactivity of organic compounds.

 

  1. 1. Mastering fundamentally and comprehensively relations of structure to physical properties and reactivity of organic compounds.
  2. Developing teaching material of relationship of structure to physical properties and reactivity of organic compounds.

 

Study Materials / Learning Materials

Valence and hybridization bonds and their applications in organic molecules, structure and chemical bonds of organic molecules, reagents in organic reactions, acid-base catalysis in organic reactions, addition reactions, substitution reactions, elimination reactions, and intramolecular reactions. Teaching materials (teaching material): characteristics and development.

Valence bond theory and hybridization, and its application in organic molecul, structure and chemical bonding in organic molecule, reactant in organic reaction, acid-base catalysis on the organic reactions, addition-substitution-elimination, and intramolecular reactions. Teaching material: characters and its development.

 

Destination /Objectives

Through lectures, discussions, understanding the content of relevant journal articles, and completing assignments, students have a basic and comprehensive understanding of: (1) valence bonds and hybridization and their application in organic molecules, (2) structure and chemical bonds of organic molecules, (3) ) reagents in organic reactions, (4) acid-base catalysis of organic reactions, (5) addition reactions, substitution reactions, elimination reactions, and intramolecular reactions, and (6) teaching materials: their characteristics and development.

 

Through expository lectures, discussions, comprehend content of relevant journal articles, and completion of assignments, students have fundamental knowledge and comprehensive understanding about: (1) Valence bond theory and hybridization, and its application in organic molecule, (2) structure and chemical bonding in organic molecule, (3) reactant in organic reaction, (4) acid-base catalysis on the organic reactions, (5) reactions of addition -substitution-elimination, and intramolecula; and (6) teaching material: characters and its development.

 

Bibliography / References

  1. Carroll. FA 2010. Perspectives on Structure and Mechanism in Organic Chemistry, 2nd Ed. Toronto: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  2. Miller, B. 2004. Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reaction and Mechanism, 2nd Ed. New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall.
  3. Isaacs, NS 1987. Physical Organic Chemistry. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

 

NKIM902 Review of Analytical Chemistry (Review on Analytical Chemistry) (3 Sks / 3 Js)

Competence / Competence

Comprehensive understanding of the basic principles and concepts of analytical chemistry both conventional and instrumentation analytical chemistry. Describe developments in analytical chemistry and the need for applications of analytical chemistry for materials analysis. Conduct studies regarding the analytical methods used to explain the properties of materials.

 

Understand comprehensively the principles and basic concepts of conventional and modern analytical chemistry. Explain the development of analytical chemistry and the needs of analytical chemistry application for material analysis.

 

Study Materials / Learning Materials

The scope of analytical chemistry includes content analysis, compound structure analysis, distribution analysis and process analysis, review of fundamental aspects of analytical chemistry, review of conventional and modern analytical methods: chromatography, spectroscopy, MS, electrometry and sensors, several modern applications. current analytical chemistry: environmental chemistry and material chemistry.

The coverage of analytical chemistry: content analysis, structural analysis, distribution analysis, process analysis; review on fundamental aspects of analytical chemistry; review on fundamental aspects in analytical chemistry: review on elementary concepts, some aspects of measurement, statistics and data evaluation. Review on conventional and modern methods in analytical chemistry: chromatography, spectroscopy, mass-spectroscopy, electrometry and sensors, some modern application in analytical chemistry: environmental chemistry chemistry and material chemistry

 

Destination / Objectives

Through literature studies, group discussions, understanding the content of relevant journal articles, and completing assignments, students can solve analytical chemistry problems comprehensively and make designs regarding the application of analytical methods, especially the use of modern instrumentation to provide a description of an advanced material. Designing analytical steps to solve analytical problems comprehensively.

Through literature study, group discussion, relevant articles reviews, and submitting assignment the students can solve problems in conventional and modern analytical chemistry especially modern analytical chemistry to describe good materials. Designing analytical steps to solve problems in analytical chemistry in comprehensive way.

 

Bibliography / References

  1. Gary, DC 1986. Analytical Chemistry, 4th Ed. Canada: John Wiley & Sons.
  2. Harvey, D. 2000. Modern Analytical Chemistry. New York: Mc Graw Hill.
  3. Settle, FA, 1997. Handbook of Instrumental Techniques in Analytical Chemistry, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, Inc.
  4. Skoog, DA & Leary, JJ, 1992, Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 4th Ed, Forth Word: Saunders College Publishing.

 

NKIM903 Review & Development of Material for Structure and Reactivity of Inorganic Compounds (Review and Development Material of Structure and Reactivity of inorganic compound) (3 Sks / 3 Js)

Competence / Competence

  1. Mastering fundamentally and comprehensively various important structures of inorganic compounds.
  2. Mastering the fundamental and comprehensive relationship between the important structures of the reactivity of inorganic compounds
  3. Developing inorganic chemistry learning materials with an emphasis on the structure and reactivity of inorganic compounds.

 

  1. Mastering fundamentally and comprehensively some important structures of inorganic compounds.
  2. Mastering fundamentally and comprehensively relations between structures and reactivity of inorganic compounds.
  3. Developing inorganic teaching material emphasized on structure and reactivity of inorganic compounds.

 

Study Materials / Learning Materials

Arrangement hcp, ccp and bcc, point symmetry and translational symmetry in crystals, point groups, space groups, crystal lattice, unit cells, Miller index, and directional index, crystal structure of NaCl, CsCl, ZnS, CaF2, TiO2, SrTiO3, spinels and silicates. Space group and structure determination based on diffraction method. Reactivity of compounds with certain structures.

 

Hcp, ccp and bcc structures, point symmetry and translation symmetry in crystal, point group, space group, crystal lattice, unit cell, Miller indices, and index of direction, crystal structure of some important compounds such as NaCl, CsCl, ZnS, CaF2, TiO2, SrTiO3, spinel, and silicate. Space groups and determination of structure based on diffraction method. Reactivity of compound adopting specific structure.

Destination /Objectives

Through lectures, discussions, understanding the content of relevant journal articles, and completing assignments, students have a basic and comprehensive understanding of: (1) the arrangement of atoms in a crystal; (2) point symmetry and translational symmetry in crystals, point groups, space groups, crystal lattices, cells, Miller index and directional index; (3) important crystal structures such as the structure of NaCl, CsCl, ZnS, CaF2, TiO2, SrTiO3, spinels, and silicates; (4) space groups; and (5) reactivity of compounds with certain structures.

Through lectures, discussions, comprehend content of relevant journal articles, and completion of assignments, students have fundamental knowledge and comprehensive understanding about: (1) arrangements of atoms in crystal; (2) Symmetry point and translation symmetry in crystal, point group, space group, crystal lattice, unit cell, Miller indices, and index of direction; (3) crystal structure of some important compounds such as NaCl, CsCl, ZnS, CaF2, TiO2, SrTiO3, spinel, and silicate; (4) space groups; and reactivity of compound having specific structure.

 

Bibliography / References

  1. Atkins, P., Overton, T., Rourke, J., Weller, M., & Armstrong, F. 2006. Shriver and Atkins Inorganic Chemistry, 4th Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  2. Constable, EC 1990. Metals and Ligands Reactivity. New York: Ellis Harwood.
  3. Cotton, FA 1971. Chemical Applications of Group Theory, 2nd Ed. New Delhi: Wiley Eastern Limited.
  4. Huheey, JE, JE, Keiter, EA, & Keiter, KL 1994. Inorganic Chemistry, Principles of Structure and Reactivity, 4th Ed. New York: Harper Collins College Publisher.
  5. Keetle, SFA 1996. Physical Inorganic Chemistry, A Coordination Approach. Oxford: The Spectrum of Academic Publishers.
  6. Lee, JD 1991. Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 4th London: Chapman and Hall.
  7. Miessler, GL & Tarr, DA 1991. Inorganic Chemistry. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc.
  8. Wells, AF 1975. Structural Inorganic Chemistry, 4th Ed. London: Oxford University Press.

 

NKIM904 Review and Development of Kinetics and Dynamics of Chemical Reactions (Review and Development Materials of Kinetics and Dynamics of Chemical Reactions) (3 Sks / 3 Js)

Competence / Competence

Students understand the empirical, hypothetical, and theoretical aspects of chemical kinetics and chemical reaction dynamics and are able to develop them as scientific study materials.

Students understand the empirical, hypothetical, and theoretical aspects of chemical kinetics and of chemical reactions dynamics and be able to develop a scientific study about this matter.

 

Study Materials / Learning Materials

Basic Concepts of Chemical Kinetics, Misconceptions in chemical kinetics, experimental procedures, Kinetic Data Analysis, Chemical reaction theory, Surface Potential Energy, Gas Phase Complex Reactions, and Liquid Phase Reactions.

Basic Concepts of Chemical Kinetics, misconceptions in chemical kinetics, experimental procedures, Kinetic Analysis of Experimental Data, Theories of chemical reactions, Potential Energy Surfaces, Reaction Complex in Gas Phases and Reactions in Solution

 

Destination / Objectives

After reviewing the material presented in this course, discussing, working on and discussing question exercises, students can understand the basic concepts of chemical kinetics, be aware of misconceptions in chemical kinetics material, understand experimental procedures, methods of kinetic data analysis, understand chemical reaction theory, surface potential energy, gas phase complex reactions, and liquid phase reactions.

After reviewing the material presented in this course, discussing, working and discussing the exercises, students can understand the concepts of Basic Chemical Kinetics, aware of the misconceptions in the chemical kinetics of the material, understand the experimental procedures, methods of kinetic data analysis, understand the theory of chemical reactions, Potential Energy Surfaces, Complex reactions in Gas Phase and in solution.

 

Bibliography / References

  1. Soustelle, Michel. 2011. An introduction to chemical kinetics. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  2. Wright, MR 2004. An Introduction to Chemical Kinetics. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  3. Wilkinson, F. 1980. Chemical kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.
  4. Griffiths, PJF & Thomas, JDR 1983. Calculations in Advanced Physical Chemistry, 5rd Ed. London: Edward Arnold.sical.

 

 

NKIM905 Philosophy and Chemistry of Biotechnology (Phylosophy and Chemistry of Biotechonology) (3 Sks /3 Js)

Competence / Competence

(1) Explain: the definition, scope, and chemical aspects of biotechnology and the role of biotechnology in human life, (2) describe the philosophy of biotechnology, (3) take lessons from bioethics and attitudes in the development and application of biotechnology.

(1) Explaining: definition, scope, and chemical aspects of biotechnology and the role of biotechnology in human life, (2) describe the philosophy of biotechnology (3) take the wisdom and attitude of bioethics in the development and application of biotechnology.

Study Materials / Learning Materials

  1. The philosophy and development of modern biotechnology and the contribution of biotechnology in supporting human life. Philosophy and development of modern biotechnology and contribution of biotechnology in supporting human life.
  2. Review of basic techniques of molecular biotechnology, biotechnology for analysis: cloning, DNA and RNA tracing (including DNA testing), protein tracking (including western blot and Elisa), stem cell, DNA microarray, and gene therapy. Reviews the basic techniques of molecular biotechnology : cloning, tracking of DNA and RNA (including DNA testing), tracking proteins (including western blot and Elisa), stem cells, DNA microarray, and gene therapy.
  3. 3. Review of products and utilization of biotechnology in health, agriculture and industry. Reviews of products and the application of biotechnology in health, agriculture and
  4. 4. Bionformatics as an important factor in the development of biotechnology: a database of biotechnology research results, accessibility, and analysis software. Bionformatics as an important factor in the development of biotechnology: a data bank of results in biotechnology research, accessibility, and analysis software.
  5. 5. Bioethics in the development and application of biotechnology. Bioethics in the development and application of biotechnology.

 

  1. Philosophy and development of modern biotechnology and contribution of biotechnology in supporting human life.
  2. Reviews the basic techniques of molecular biotechnology: cloning, tracking of DNA and RNA (including DNA testing), tracking proteins (including western blot and Elisa), stem cells, DNA microarray, and gene therapy.
  3. Reviews of products and the application of biotechnology in health, agriculture and industry.
  4. Bionformatics as an important factor in the development of biotechnology: a data bank of results in biotechnology research, accessibility, and analysis software.
  5. Bioethics in the development and application of biotechnology.

 

Destination / Objectives

After learning biotechnology through literature studies, discussions, presentations and structured assignments, students are able to understand: the relationship between biotechnology and chemistry, the role of biotechnology in human life, responsive to the problems of the use of biotechnology in human life and able to take lessons and biethics in the development of research and biotechnology applications. .

After learning biotechnology through literature study, discussion, presentation and structured assignments students are able to understand: relation between biotechnology and chemistry, the role of biotechnology in human life, and perceptive in bioethics in biotechnology research and applications.

 

Bibliography / References

  1. Glick, BR, Pasternak, JJ, & Patten, CL 2010. Molecular Biotechnology, Principal and Applications of Recombinant DNA. ASM Press.
  2. Brown, TA 1995. Gene Cloning: An introduction, 3rd Ed. London: Chapman & Hall.
  3. Peruski Jr., LF & Peruski AH, 1997, The Internet And The New Biology: Tools For Genomic and Molecular Research. American Society For Microbiology, Washington DC
  4. Lea, PJ & Leegood, RC (Ed). 1999. Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Chicester: John Wiley & Sons.
  5. Harper DR & read AP 1994, DNA Finger Printing. Oxford “BIOS Scientific Publisher Ltd.
  6. Maulik, S. & Patel, SD 1997. Molecular Biotechnology: Therapeutic Application And Strategies. Stanford, California. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

 

MDIS990 Dissertation (Dissertation) (28 Sks)

Competence / Competence

Students are able to carry out investigations and analysis, using scientific methods, of actual problems in chemistry education at the high school and college level, find solutions to these problems, and be able to anticipate the same problems do not arise in the future. Students are able to design effective chemistry lessons to be applied in the future. Students are able to describe the process of investigation and analysis and the results obtained in the form of a dissertation.

Students are able to carry out investigation and analysis, using scientific method, about actual chemistry education problem in the level of high school and university, and are able to avoid the occurrence of the same problem in the future. Students are able to design chemistry learning effective to implement in the future. Students are able to describe their investigation and analysis processes and their finding in the form of dissertation. 

 

Destination / Objectives

Producing a quality dissertation for each student as a compulsory final work, through a scientific research and writing process under the guidance of competent lecturers. Every dissertation is endeavored to make a meaningful contribution to the development of chemistry education in the future.

Students are expected to produce a quality dissertation on chemical education area, through a process of scientific investigation and writing. In order to produce this thesis students will work under supervision of competent lecturer (s). It's expected that each thesis will contribute significantly to the development of chemical education in the future.

 

Study Materials / Learning Materials

The dissertation is developed from actual problems in chemistry education, by making maximum use of relevant references, especially those published in international scientific journals in the last 5 - 10 years. The dissertation is the final result of a series of independent student academic activities starting with an assessment of the actual situation and developing thoughts to find solutions, developing research designs, carrying out field research and ending with writing into a dissertation form. In this process students are required to do at least 1 x (one time) seminar on the problem raised and the solution plan, in front of fellow students and supervisors and not supervisors. For the purposes of student guidance, students can be asked to do more than one seminar.

This course gives the opportunity for the students to train themselves in planning, implementing and reporting a systematic and scientific study, in the field of Chemistry Education. This is done in order to fulfill the requirements of producing a dissertation in this field as the students' final work. Students are given opportunities to prepare a proposal (or a pre-proposal) of a study to be discussed together with their fellow students under the guidance of their academic supervisors and seminar coordinator. From this activity the students will further develop their proposal and carry-out their investigation. The activity will culminate in the production of a dissertation.

 

Bibliography / Reference

  1. Barrass, R. 1991. Scientists Must Write: A guide to better writing for scientists, engineers and students. London: Chapman & Hall.
  2. Chandrasekar, R. 2002. How to Write A Thesis: A Working Guide. Perth: The University of Western Australia. Available on: http://ciips.ee.uwa.edu.au/pub/ HowToWriteAThesis.pdf.
  3. Gopen, D & Swan, JA 1990. The science of scientific writing. American Scientist, Vol. 78, pp. 550–558.
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